Sardine Tartine

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Last week the husband and I took a much needed hiatus to the Outer Banks in North Carolina with a pit stop in Richmond, Virginia. We were blessed with incredible weather and quality time with family and friends. And while we were supposed to return well-rested and refreshed, we returned exhausted with nagging sore throats – monsoon season and the “pollen tsunami” in Stamford seems to be adding to the agony. But it’s all good because this week I’ve focused on making brain and heart healthy meals to detoxify our weary bodies.

And what do I think of when I think of brain and heart healthy? Omega 3 fatty-acids and whole grains! So just like that, this meal of a sardine tartine on rye bread and bone broth came together. A tartine is simply an open faced sandwich with origins all over Europe, but I am partial to those made in Belgium or Sweden.

This meal might seem a little strange and maybe even unappetizing to some, but I find it completely satisfying. And keep in mind, the sardine tartine toppings can be modified to suit anyone’s fancy. A tomato based spread with feta would be great, or even mustard and Swiss cheese could replace the ricotta and cucumber. The possibilities are endless!

One recommendation: use sturdy, dense bread when making tartines. Otherwise you will make a mess and all of the toppings will fall off during consumption, which can be a pain. During our stop in Richmond, I picked up a loaf of my favorite bread (light rye) from everyone’s favorite bakery, Sub Rosa.  The loaf is made from Turkey red wheat and heirloom Abruzzi rye, so it is not quite a whole rye, but is still packed with whole grain goodness.

And the broth I made wasn’t fancy by any means so I didn’t include the recipe below – I just used some leftover frozen chicken and beef bones, carrots, onion, celery, dill, and parsley. Read more about broth I’ve made in the past here. While the likelihood that broth is a cure-all, miracle food is low, it does promote hydration and create a sense of calm and comfort – so that’s good enough for me!

 

Grocery List

Serves 1

1 4.25 oz package of quality Portuguese sardines in olive oil (I prefer the Bela brand)

3-5 cucumber slices

Ricotta cheese for spreading

Shallot or red onion, thinly sliced

Dill sprigs, cracked red pepper flakes, and sea salt for garnish

1 -2 slices rye bread

 

How To

Lightly toast the rye bread. Then, spread on a generous amount of ricotta cheese. Layer the cucumber and shallot slices on top. Next, spread the sardines evenly over the cucumber and shallot slices. Sprinkle with cracked red pepper and sea salt. Finish with a sprig of dill. Serve with a cup of bone broth. That’s it!

Advertisements

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s